The ultimate brewing and fermentation guide
Water Kefir Grains in a jar

A step by step guide to making your own water kefir

Ingredients
  • 1/4 cup water kefir grains
  • 1/4 cup sugar (white sugar, cane sugar, or coconut sugar)
  • 4 cups filtered water
  • Flavorings (optional): fruit juice, slices of fresh fruit, herbs, or spices
Equipment
  • Glass jar or fermentation vessel
  • Non-metal stirring utensil (wooden or plastic)
  • Breathable cloth or coffee filter
  • Rubber band or string
  • Strainer or mesh sieve
Instructions
  1. Dissolve the sugar:
    • In a clean glass jar or fermentation vessel, dissolve the sugar in warm water (about 1 cup).
    • Stir until the sugar is completely dissolved.
  2. Add the remaining water:
    • Add the remaining filtered water (3 cups) to the jar and stir to combine.
  3. Add the water kefir grains:
    • Add the water kefir grains to the sugar water solution in the jar.
    • Use a non-metal stirring utensil to gently stir the mixture.
  4. Cover and ferment:
    • Cover the jar with a breathable cloth or coffee filter, and secure it with a rubber band or string.
    • Place the jar in a warm spot, ideally around 68-85°F (20-30°C), away from direct sunlight.
    • Allow the water kefir to ferment for approximately 24-48 hours. The fermentation time can vary based on temperature and desired taste. Taste the kefir periodically to check for desired sweetness and flavor.
  5. Strain the water kefir:
    • After the fermentation period, prepare a clean glass jar or container and a strainer or mesh sieve.
    • Gently strain the fermented liquid through the strainer, separating the water kefir grains from the liquid. Set the grains aside for the next batch.
  6. Optional: Flavor and carbonate:
    • If desired, this is the stage to add flavorings to the strained water kefir. You can add fruit juice, slices of fresh fruit, herbs, or spices. Experiment with different combinations and flavors to suit your taste preferences.
    • Transfer the flavored water kefir to airtight bottles or jars, leaving some headspace for carbonation.
  7. Secondary fermentation (optional):
    • If you want to increase the carbonation level, seal the bottles or jars tightly and let them sit at room temperature for an additional 24-48 hours.
    • Keep an eye on the carbonation level, as excessive pressure can build up in the bottles. Burp the bottles periodically by slightly opening them to release excess gas.
  8. Chill and enjoy:
    • Once the water kefir reaches your desired flavor and carbonation level, transfer the bottles or jars to the refrigerator to slow down fermentation and chill the drink.
    • Water kefir can be consumed immediately, but it will continue to develop flavors in the refrigerator over time.
    • Remember to save a portion of the strained water kefir as a starter for your next batch.

That’s it! You now have homemade water kefir ready to be enjoyed. Remember to keep your kefir grains in a small amount of sugar water (1/4 cup sugar to 1 cup water) in the refrigerator if you don’t plan to make a new batch immediately. Enjoy the probiotic-rich, lightly sweet, and fizzy beverage as a refreshing and healthy drink.

Don’t forget to check out our water kefir recipes page for the very latest successful BrewKnowhoo experiments!

Can i make my own water kefir grains without a starter?

No, it is not possible to create water kefir grains from scratch without a starter culture. Water kefir grains are a unique combination of beneficial bacteria and yeasts that form symbiotic colonies. They cannot be…

Read more

A step by step guide to making your own water kefir

Ingredients Equipment Instructions That’s it! You now have homemade water kefir ready to be enjoyed. Remember to keep your kefir grains in a small amount of sugar water (1/4 cup sugar to 1 cup water)…

Read more

Different strains of water kefir grains and how they are different.

There are several different strains of water kefir grains, each with its own characteristics and fermentation properties. Here are some of the commonly known strains and their differences: Lactobacillus species-dominant strains Acetobacter species-dominant strains Yeast…

Read more